Water management

FILE - In this Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, file photo, an egret looks for food along Valhalla Pond in Riverview, Fla. The Trump administration was expected to announce completion as soon as Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020, of one of its most momentous environmental rollbacks, removing federal protections for millions of miles of the country’s streams, arroyos and wetlands. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
January 23, 2020 - 3:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Thursday ended federal protection for many of the nation's millions of miles of streams, arroyos and wetlands, a sweeping environmental rollback that could leave the waterways more vulnerable to pollution from development, industry and farms. The policy...
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January 19, 2020 - 3:24 pm
HUTCHINSON, Kan. (AP) — A small earthquake was reported in southern Kansas on Sunday. The U.S. Geological Survey said a magnitude 4.5 earthquake struck about 2 miles (3 kilometers) southwest of Hutchinson shortly after 1 p.m. The service had initially reported that it was a magnitude 4.4 earthquake...
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In this undated photo provided by the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries, a winter skate rests among seagrass at a monitoring site in the sound off shore from Salem, Mass. Seagrass meadows, found in coastlines all coastal areas around the world except Antarctica's shores, are among the most poorly protected but widespread coastal habitats in the world. Studies have found more than 70 species of seagrass that can reduce erosion and improve water quality, while providing food and shelter for sea creatures. (Tay Evans/Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries via AP)
December 22, 2019 - 9:29 am
DURHAM, N.H. (AP) — Peering over the side of his skiff anchored in the middle of New Hampshire’s Great Bay, Fred Short liked what he saw. Just below the surface, the 69-year-old marine ecologist noticed beds of bright green seagrass swaying in the waist-deep water. It was the latest sign that these...
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Dozens of barrels fill an outside storage area at Seattle Barrel and Cooperage Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Seattle. The century-old Seattle barrel company has been indicted along with its third-generation owner in what prosecutors describe as a long-running pollution conspiracy. The 36-count indictment, made public in U.S. District Court in Seattle on Wednesday, says the company used a hidden drain to pump caustic wastewater directly into the King County sewer system. That's despite telling officials that the company reused all its wastewater and didn't discharge any. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
December 18, 2019 - 5:19 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A century-old Seattle barrel company has been indicted along with its third-generation owner in what prosecutors describe as a long-running pollution conspiracy. The 36-count indictment made public Wednesday said Seattle Barrel and Cooperage used a hidden drain to pump caustic...
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CORRECTS LAST NAME TO MCKENZIE, INSTEAD OF MCKENVIE In this photo provided by Cynthia McKenzie is sewage backup that flooded the bottom of a staircase in her home, Saturday, Nov. 30, 2019, in the Jamaica, Queens section of New York. Officials say a water condition is causing human waste to back up into several hundred homes there. (Cynthia McKenzie via AP)
November 30, 2019 - 11:49 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A blocked sewer main flooded basements Saturday with brown filth and left residents in the neighborhood near New York City’s Kennedy Airport feeling sickened by the stench. A water condition caused the backup, pushing human waste into about 300 homes in Jamaica, Queens, officials...
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FILE - In this Nov. 8, 2018, file photo, a lead pipe, left, is seen in a hole the kitchen ceiling in the home of Desmond Odom, in Newark, N.J. The Trump administration is proposing a rewrite of rules for dealing with lead pipes contaminating drinking water, but critics say the changes appear to give water systems decades more time to replace pipes leaching dangerous amounts of toxic lead. Contrary to regulatory rollbacks in many other environmental areas, the administration has called dealing with lead contamination in drinking water a priority. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
October 10, 2019 - 3:24 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Thursday proposed a rewrite of rules for dealing with lead pipes contaminating drinking water, but critics say the changes appear to give water systems decades more time to replace pipes leaching dangerous amounts of toxic lead. Contrary to regulatory...
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October 02, 2019 - 9:15 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Trump administration ratcheted up its feud with California on Wednesday as the Environmental Protection Agency issued a notice accusing San Francisco of violating the federal Clean Water Act. Last month, President Donald Trump warned of a potential violation notice, saying...
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September 27, 2019 - 8:54 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Engaged in environmental battles with the Trump administration on multiple fronts, California Gov. Gavin Newsom angered some allies on Friday by vetoing a bill aimed at blunting federal rollbacks of clean air and endangered species regulations in the state. The bill would...
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FILE - In this Feb. 26, 2016 file photo, a city worker uses a power washer to clean the sidewalk by a tent city along Division Street in San Francisco. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says California is falling short on preventing water pollution, largely because of its problem with homelessness in cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler outlined the complaints Thursday, Sept. 26, 2019 in a letter to California Gov. Gavin Newsom. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
September 26, 2019 - 12:53 pm
California is failing to protect its waters from pollution, partly because of a worsening problem with homelessness in large cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler outlined a series of alleged...
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Buckets are seen in a queue to fetch water at a borehole in Harare, Tuesday, Sept, 24, 2019. The more than 2 million residents of Zimbabwe's capital and surrounding towns are now without water after authorities shut down the city's main treatment plant, raising new fears about disease after a recent cholera outbreak while the economy crumbles further. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
September 24, 2019 - 7:23 am
HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — The more than 2 million residents of Zimbabwe's capital and surrounding towns are now without water after authorities shut down the city's main treatment plant, raising new fears about disease after a recent cholera outbreak while the economy crumbles further. Officials in...
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