Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

FILE - In this May 1, 2020, file photo, campaign workers David Woodruff, left, and Jason White, right, deliver boxes of initiative petitions signatures to the Missouri secretary of state's office in Jefferson City, Mo. President Donald Trump is still trying to overturn “Obamacare,” but his predecessor’s health care law keeps gaining ground in places where it was once unwelcome. Missouri voters this week approved Medicaid expansion by a 53% to 47% margin, making the conservative state the seventh to do so under Trump. (AP Photo/David A. Lieb, File)
August 06, 2020 - 4:25 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is still trying to overturn “Obamacare,” but his predecessor's health care law keeps gaining ground in places where it was once unwelcome. Missouri voters this week approved Medicaid expansion by a 53% to 47% margin, making the conservative state the seventh...
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FILE - This file image provided by U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service shows the website for HealthCare.gov. Close to half a million people who lost their health insurance amid the economic shutdown to slow the spread of COVID-19 have gotten coverage through HealthCare.gov, the government reported Thursday, June 25, 2020. (U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service via AP, File)
July 17, 2020 - 4:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A divided federal appeals court on Friday upheld the Trump administration’s expansion of cheaper short-term health insurance plans, derided by critics as “junk insurance,” as an alternative to the Affordable Care Act’s costlier comprehensive insurance. The U.S. Court of Appeals...
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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, June 26, 2020. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
June 29, 2020 - 4:56 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats pushed a package expanding “Obamacare” coverage through the House on Monday, a measure that's doomed to advance no further but spotlights how the coronavirus pandemic and President Donald Trump's efforts to obliterate that law have fortified health care's potency as a...
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FILE - This file image provided by U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service shows the website for HealthCare.gov. Close to half a million people who lost their health insurance amid the economic shutdown to slow the spread of COVID-19 have gotten coverage through HealthCare.gov, the government reported Thursday, June 25, 2020. (U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service via AP, File)
June 26, 2020 - 9:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — As coronavirus cases rise in more than half of the states, the Trump administration is urging the Supreme Court to overturn the Affordable Care Act. The administration's high court filing at 10:30 p.m. Thursday came the same day the government reported that close to half a million...
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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., speaks during news conference unveiling the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Enhancement Act on Capitol Hill in Washington on Wednesday, June 24, 2020. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
June 24, 2020 - 3:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Flicking a dismissive jab at President Donald Trump, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi unveiled a plan Wednesday to expand “Obamacare," even as Trump's administration is about to file arguments in a Supreme Court case to strike it down. Pelosi announced an upcoming floor vote on her...
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President Donald Trump arrives to speaks at an event on police reform, in the Rose Garden of the White House, Tuesday, June 16, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
June 16, 2020 - 5:30 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. officials said Tuesday they expect health insurance companies will cover vaccines for COVID-19 without charging copays, once those vaccines are developed and become available. At a briefing for reporters, a senior Trump administration official said the government has been...
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FILE - This file image provided by U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service shows the website for HealthCare.gov. Many laid-off workers who lost health insurance in the coronavirus shutdown soon face the first deadlines to qualify for fallback coverage under the Affordable Care Act. (U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service via AP, File)
May 25, 2020 - 4:48 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Many laid-off workers who lost health insurance in the coronavirus shutdown soon face the first deadlines to qualify for fallback coverage under the Affordable Care Act. Taxpayer-subsidized health insurance is available for a modest cost — sometimes even free — across the country...
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In this May 3, 2020 photo, the setting sun shines on the Supreme Court building on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
May 06, 2020 - 9:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court held Day Three of arguments by telephone with the audio available live to audiences around the world. The higher profile case of the two heard by the justices on Wednesday dealt with Trump administration rules that would allow more employers who cite a religious...
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In this May 4, 2020, photo, the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court's third day of hearing arguments by telephone is its first chance at a high-profile case, this one involving the Affordable Care Act. The justices are hearing a dispute Wednesday about Trump administration rules that would allow more employers who cite a religious or moral objection to opt out of providing no-cost birth control to women. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
May 06, 2020 - 9:47 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in a dispute involving Trump administration rules that would allow more employers who cite a religious or moral objection to opt out of providing no-cost birth control to women. With arguments conducted by telephone because of the...
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FILE - In this April 20, 2020, file photo, resident physician Leslie Bottrell stands outside a room at an Intensive Care Unit as a nurse suctions the lungs of a COVID-19 patient at St. Joseph's Hospital in Yonkers, N.Y. COVID-19 could have stamped someone “uninsurable”  if not for the Affordable Care Act. The ban on insurers using preexisting conditions to deny coverage is a key part of the Obama-era law that the Trump administration still seeks to overturn. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
May 03, 2020 - 8:17 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — COVID-19 could have stamped a person “uninsurable” if not for the Affordable Care Act. The ban on insurers using preexisting conditions to deny coverage is a key part of the Obama-era law that the Trump administration still seeks to overturn. Without the law, people who recovered...
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