Native Americans

August 15, 2018 - 5:07 pm
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — An organization working to legalize casinos in Arkansas says it raised more than $1 million last month from two American Indian tribes in neighboring Oklahoma. Driving Arkansas Forward reported Wednesday that it spent nearly $1.5 million in July and ended the month with $61...
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August 12, 2018 - 10:53 am
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Gov. Andrew Cuomo recently told a story about grabbing a feather shed by an eagle after it swooped past his family's canoe during an outing on an Adirondack lake. The New York Democrat says he still has the feather on his fireplace. According to federal law, that's a major no-no...
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Sharice Davids addresses her supporters at Breit's Stein and Deli in Kansas City, Kan., Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018. Davids, a Democrat, is running for a seat in Kansas' 3rd Congressional District. (Luke Harbur/The Kansas City Star via AP)
August 08, 2018 - 9:55 am
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Sharice Davids shattered the mold for a congressional primary winner from ruby red Kansas on Wednesday, becoming the state's first Native American and gay nominee for Congress. The 38-year-old attorney and activist prevailed in a close six-candidate Democratic primary Tuesday...
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In this photo provided by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections, Patrick Dwyane Murphy is pictured in a photo in McAlester, Okla., dated July 8, 2004. Murphy, a 49-year-old member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation on death row, had his conviction and death sentence tossed by a federal appeals court.(Oklahoma Department of Corrections via AP)
July 28, 2018 - 9:48 am
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Legal experts say a federal appeals court ruling that overturned a condemned Native American man's murder conviction in Oklahoma on jurisdictional grounds could radically change how tribal members are prosecuted in a massive area that was assigned to tribes before Oklahoma...
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U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., waves as she arrives at Belkin Family Lookout Farm before a town hall event, Sunday, July 8, 2018, in Natick, Mass. Warren is hosting the town hall and cookout following an Independence Day trip to visit U.S. troops in Iraq and Kuwait. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
July 08, 2018 - 5:52 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has tackled Trump administration immigration policies and her heritage during a town hall she hosted. The Democrat has posed the question "who does the government work for" at a Sunday event in Natick. Warren is fresh off an Independence Day trip to...
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July 08, 2018 - 3:29 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — In a story July 7 about an Idaho gubernatorial candidate, The Associated Press reported erroneously the religious affiliation of former Democratic Gov. Cecil Andrus. Andrus was not Mormon. The Associated Press also erroneously reported that the top two gubernatorial candidates...
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As the Public Utilities Commission nears a vote, Tania Aubid leaves the room and tells commissioners, “You have just declared war on the Ojibwe people.” Aubid is Ojibwe. She said, after leaving the meeting, “I’m hurt because Minnesota did not uphold their end to protect Native people. We were giving them the voice for a healthy future.” The Minnesota Public Utilities Commission began its deliberations on Enbridge Energy's proposed Line 3 pipeline replacement project Thursday, June 28, 2018 at its headquarters in St. Paul, ten days after beginning its final round of hearings and question sessions in the case. (Evan Frost/Minnesota Public Radio via AP)
June 28, 2018 - 5:57 pm
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Minnesota regulators on Thursday approved Enbridge Energy's proposal to replace its aging Line 3 oil pipeline across the northern part of the state. All five members of the Public Utilities Commission backed the project, though some cited heavy trepidation, and a narrow...
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FILE - In this March 30, 1942 file photo, Cpl. George Bushy, left, a member of the military guard which supervised the departure of 237 Japanese people for California, holds the youngest child of Shigeho Kitamoto, center, as she and her children are evacuated from Bainbridge Island, Wash. Throughout American history, during times of war and unrest, authorities have cited various reasons and laws to take children away from their parents. Examples include Native American boarding schools, Japanese internment camps and deportations that happened during the Great Depression. (AP Photo/File)
June 20, 2018 - 7:54 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Some critics of the forced separation of Latino children from their migrant parents say the practice is unprecedented. But it's not the first time the U.S. government has split up families, detained children or allowed others to do so . Throughout American history, during...
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FILE - In this April 2, 2018 file photo, Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II, center, and Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis, left, co-chairs of the Poor People's Campaign, speak at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn. They announced the campaign is preparing for 40 days of non-violent "direct action" in about 30 states that will climax with a rally in Washington this June. The organization is the rekindling of the campaign to help poor people that the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was working on when he was killed April 4, 1968, in Memphis. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
June 15, 2018 - 1:51 am
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Thousands of anti-poverty activists have launched a campaign in recent weeks modeled after Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Poor People's Campaign of 1968. Like the push 50 years ago, advocates are hoping to draw attention to those struggling with deep poverty from Appalachia...
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FILE - In this June 22, 2015 photo, Melissa Erkel, a fish passage biologist with the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, looks at a culvert, a large pipe that allows streams to pass beneath roads but block migrating salmon, along the north fork of Newaukum Creek near Enumclaw, Wash. The Supreme Court is leaving in place a court order that forces Washington state to restore salmon habitat by removing barriers that block fish migration. The justices divided 4-4 Monday, June 11, 2018, in the long-running dispute that pits the state against Indian tribes and the federal government. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, file)
June 11, 2018 - 5:40 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Washington state must restore salmon habitat by removing barriers that block fish migration after the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday left in place a lower court order. The justices divided 4-4 in the long-running dispute that pits the state against Northwest Indian tribes and the...
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