Military legal affairs

FILE - In this May 1, 2019, file photo, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange puts his fist up as he is taken from court in London. The Justice Department has charged Assange with receiving and publishing classified information. The charges are contained in a new, 18-count indictment announced May 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
May 24, 2019 - 2:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a case with significant First Amendment implications, the U.S. filed new charges Thursday against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, accusing him of violating the Espionage Act by publishing secret documents containing the names of confidential military and diplomatic sources...
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FILE - In this May 1, 2019, file photo, protesters demonstrate outside court where Julian Assange will appear in London. The Justice Department has charged Assange with receiving and publishing classified information. The charges are contained in a new, 18-count indictment announced May 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
May 23, 2019 - 11:40 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on U.S. charges against Wikileaks founder Julian Assange (all times local): 5:10 p.m. A lawyer for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange says the "unprecedented charges" against his client threaten all journalists looking to inform the public about actions taken by the...
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FILE - This 2018 file photo provided by Andrea Gallagher shows her husband, Navy SEAL Edward Gallagher, who has been charged with murder in the 2017 death of an Iraqi war prisoner. Lawyers on Gallagher's defense team told The Associated Press that emails they and a reporter received from military prosecutors in the case contained tracking software. (Andrea Gallagher via AP, File)
May 22, 2019 - 10:11 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — A judge delayed the murder case Wednesday of a decorated Navy SEAL to first make sure the government's monitoring of defense team emails did not compromise his right to a fair trial. Lawyers defending Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher want the judge in the case removed...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2018, file photo, the International border cuts through Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, rear, as seen from Nogales, Ariz. Federal court records say a Border Patrol agent in Arizona sent texts referring to migrants as "savages" and "subhuman" the month before allegedly knocking over a Guatemalan man with his patrol vehicle. The filings in U.S. District Court in Tucson earlier in May 2019 say Agent Matthew Bowen sent the text messages in November 2017, weeks before allegedly knocking down the migrant. He goes on trial Aug. 13. He has pleaded not guilty to depriving the migrant of his rights and falsifying records. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
May 20, 2019 - 6:26 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A Border Patrol agent in Arizona sent texts calling immigrants "savages" and "subhuman" the month before using his patrol vehicle to knock over a Guatemalan man who was trying to flee, prosecutors say. Court documents filed earlier this month in U.S. District Court in Tucson say...
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FILE - In this Aug. 18, 2016 file photo, Sameer Ahmed, a Kashmiri man allegedly beaten up by Indian soldiers at Khrew village, recovers at a local hospital in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir. A prominent rights group in Indian-controlled Kashmir is advocating United Nations to establish a commission of inquiry to probe endemic use of torture by government forces who have faced decades long anti-India uprising in the disputed region. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin, File)
May 20, 2019 - 5:58 am
SRINAGAR, India (AP) — A prominent rights group in Indian-controlled Kashmir is advocating for the United Nations to establish a commission of inquiry to investigate what it calls the endemic use of torture by government forces amid a decades-long anti-India uprising in the disputed region. The...
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Former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning speaks with reporters, after arriving at the federal courthouse in Alexandria, Va., Thursday, May 16, 2019. Manning spoke about the federal court’s continued attempts to compel her to testify in front of a grand jury. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
May 16, 2019 - 5:58 pm
ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) — Former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning was ordered back to jail Thursday for refusing to testify to a grand jury, even after telling a judge she'd rather "starve to death" than cooperate with prosecutors. U.S. District Judge Anthony Trenga ordered her to remain...
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Former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning speaks with reporters, after arriving at the federal courthouse in Alexandria, Va., Thursday, May 16, 2019. Manning spoke about the federal court’s continued attempts to compel her to testify in front of a grand jury. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
May 16, 2019 - 3:18 pm
ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) — The Latest on Chelsea Manning's refusal to testify before a grand jury investigating Wikileaks (all times local): 4 p.m. Former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning has been sent to jail - again - for refusing to testify to a grand jury. A judge on Thursday ordered...
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May 15, 2019 - 3:34 pm
NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — A U.S. Navy SEAL is expected to formally accept a plea deal on Thursday for his role in the 2017 strangulation death of a U.S. Army Green Beret in Africa. Navy SEAL Adam Matthews is one for four U.S. service members charged with murder and related counts in the death of Army...
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FILE - This 2018 file photo provided by Andrea Gallagher shows her husband, Navy SEAL Edward Gallagher, who has been charged with murder in the 2017 death of an Iraqi war prisoner. Lawyers on Gallagher's defense team told The Associated Press that emails they and a reporter received from military prosecutors in the case contained tracking software. (Andrea Gallagher via AP, File)
May 13, 2019 - 8:08 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Military prosecutors in the case of a Navy SEAL charged with killing an Islamic State prisoner in Iraq in 2017 installed tracking software in emails sent to defense lawyers and a reporter in an attempt to discover who was leaking information to the news media, according to...
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This Oct. 14, 2018, image provided by Tom Johnson shows campers along the shoreline of Lake Holloman at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico. The New Mexico attorney general's office on Thursday, May 9, 2019, requested that the U.S. Air Force close the lake to the public after sampling turned up high levels of hazardous chemicals. (Tom Johnson via AP)
May 09, 2019 - 10:38 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico's top prosecutor is demanding that the U.S. Air Force close a publicly accessible lake at Holloman Air Force Base, saying Thursday the concentration of hazardous chemicals at the site poses a risk to public health and the environment. In a letter obtained by The...
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