Lawsuits

January 17, 2019 - 9:54 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The father of a man accused of fatally shooting four people at a Nashville Waffle House last year wants a lawsuit against him by a victim's mother thrown out. The suit accuses Jeffrey Reinking of negligence and conspiracy for returning several guns to his mentally unstable...
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January 17, 2019 - 1:58 pm
TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Workers who sued General Motors after nooses and racist graffiti were found at its largest U.S. transmission plant nearly two years ago are still facing racial harassment, their attorney said Thursday. Just this week, one of the workers found a monkey doll and a racist drawing...
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FILE- In this May 2, 2018, file photo the logo for Snap Inc. appears above a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Snap Inc. is getting hit hard in premarket trading after the social media company said its second chief financial officer is leaving, the second to do so in the past year. In a regulatory filing Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019, the company said Tim Stone is leaving to pursue other opportunities. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
January 16, 2019 - 10:23 am
Another high-level departure at Snap Inc. rattled investors in the social media company, which is losing its second chief financial officer in less than year. In a regulatory filing Tuesday, the company said Tim Stone is leaving to pursue other opportunities. He had joined the Santa Monica,...
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FILE - In this Nov. 10, 2018 file photo, with a downed power utility pole in the foreground, Eric England, right, searches through a friend's vehicle after the wildfire burned through Paradise, Calif. Facing potentially colossal liabilities over deadly California wildfires, PG&E will file for bankruptcy protection. The announcement Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, follows the resignation of the power company’s chief executive. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
January 15, 2019 - 7:50 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Pacific Gas & Electric Co. said this week it will file for bankruptcy, raising concern that rates for electricity and gas will rise and victims of California wildfires who are suing the nation's largest utility won't get all the money they may be owed. Here are some...
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The main entrance to Mount Carmel West Hospital is shown Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019. An intensive care doctor ordered "significantly excessive and potentially fatal" doses of pain medicine for over two dozen near-death patients in the past few years after families asked that lifesaving measures be stopped, an Ohio hospital system announced after being sued by a family alleging a dose of fentanyl hastened a woman's death. The Columbus-area Mount Carmel Health System said it fired the doctor, reported its findings to authorities and removed multiple employees from patient care pending further investigation, including nurses who administered the medication and pharmacists. (AP Photo/Andrew Welsh Huggins)
January 15, 2019 - 6:36 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — An intensive care doctor ordered "significantly excessive and potentially fatal" doses of pain medicine for at least 27 near-death patients in the past few years after families asked that lifesaving measures be stopped, an Ohio hospital system announced after being sued by a...
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FILE - In this April 29, 2010 file photo, census employees, including Joseph Mintz, seated, and Lesley Rubinger, far right, assemble after a training course in New York. A federal judge blocked the Trump administration Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019, from asking about citizenship status on the 2020 census, the first major ruling in cases contending that officials ramrodded the question through for Republican political purposes to intentionally undercount immigrants. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)
January 15, 2019 - 5:37 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A federal judge blocked the Trump administration Tuesday from asking about citizenship status on the 2020 census, the first major ruling in cases contending officials ramrodded the question through for Republican political purposes to intentionally undercount immigrants. In a 277-...
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January 15, 2019 - 2:58 pm
BOSTON (AP) — A member of the family that owns OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma told people gathered at the prescription opioid painkiller's launch party in the 1990s that it would be "followed by a blizzard of prescriptions that will bury the competition." That's according to court documents filed...
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FILE - In this March 25, 2015 file photo, Margot Riphagen of New Orleans, La., wears a birth control pills costume during a protest in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. A U.S. judge will hear arguments Friday, Jan. 11, 2019, over California's attempt to block new rules by the Trump administration that would allow more employers to opt out of providing no-cost birth control to women. The new rules are set to go into effect on Monday, Jan. 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
January 14, 2019 - 5:27 pm
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — A federal judge on Monday put a nationwide hold on Trump administration rules that allow more employers to opt out of providing women with no-cost birth control. U.S. District Judge Wendy Beetlestone in Philadelphia agreed with a lawsuit originally filed by Pennsylvania,...
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FILE - In this Nov. 10, 2018 file photo, with a downed power utility pole in the foreground, Eric England, right, searches through a friend's vehicle after the wildfire burned through Paradise, Calif. Facing potentially colossal liabilities over deadly California wildfires, PG&E will file for bankruptcy protection. The announcement Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, follows the resignation of the power company’s chief executive. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
January 14, 2019 - 4:54 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The nation's largest utility said Monday it is filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy because it faces at least $30 billion in potential damages from lawsuits over the catastrophic wildfires in California in 2017 and 2018 that killed scores of people and destroyed thousands of homes...
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FILE - This Friday, Jan. 4, 2019, file photo shows Hacienda HealthCare in Phoenix. State regulators reportedly wanted to remove developmentally disabled patients from a Phoenix long-term care facility years before a woman in a vegetative state gave birth. The Arizona Republic reported Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019, that Hacienda HealthCare faced a criminal investigation in 2016. The facility allegedly billed the state some $4 million in bogus 2014 charges for wages, transportation, housekeeping, maintenance and supplies. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
January 13, 2019 - 1:56 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Regulators wanted to remove developmentally disabled patients from a Phoenix long-term care facility years before a woman in a vegetative state gave birth, Arizona's largest newspaper reported Sunday. The Arizona Republic reported Hacienda HealthCare faced a 2016 criminal...
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