Extrasolar planets

This illustration made available by the European Southern Observatory in March 2020 depicts iron rain that may have been detected in the atmosphere of the ultra-hot exoplanet WASP-76b. Discovered just a few years ago, this planet is nearly twice the size of Jupiter yet takes less than two days to orbit its star. Because the planet's rotation matches the time it takes to complete an orbit, the same side always faces the star. (M. Kornmesser/ESO via AP)
March 11, 2020 - 12:15 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — At one hot, faraway world, it's always cloudy with a chance of iron rain. That's the otherworldly forecast from Swiss and other European astronomers who have detected clouds full of iron droplets at a hot Jupiterlike planet 390 light-years away. This mega planet is so...
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In this photo released on Saturday, Dec. 11, 2019 by the European Space Agency (ESA), the Cheops satellite, installed on the flight adapter ring is being placed on the Soyuz Fregat launch vehicle. European space officials on Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2019 postponed the launch of a three-year mission to study planets in other solar systems shortly before it was due to blast off. (M. Pedoussaut/ESA via AP)
December 18, 2019 - 3:03 am
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — A European spacecraft launched from South America Wednesday on a three-year mission to study planets in other solar systems. The Characterising ExOPlanets Satellite (CHEOPS) mission blasted off from Kourou, French Guiana at 0854 GMT (3:54 a.m. EST) atop a Russian Soyuz...
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In this photo released on Saturday, Dec. 11, 2019 by the European Space Agency (ESA), the Cheops satellite, installed on the flight adapter ring is being placed on the Soyuz Fregat launch vehicle. European space officials on Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2019 postponed the launch of a three-year mission to study planets in other solar systems shortly before it was due to blast off. (M. Pedoussaut/ESA via AP)
December 17, 2019 - 11:53 am
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — European space officials on Tuesday postponed the launch of a three-year mission to study planets in other solar systems shortly before it was due to blast off. The European Space Agency announced that the launch from Kourou, French Guiana, of the Characterising...
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Nobel Physics Laureate Didier Queloz speaks during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden Saturday, Dec. 7, 2019. (Jonas Ekstromer /TT News Agency via AP)
December 07, 2019 - 10:12 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — An astronomer who shares this year's Nobel physics prize for discovering a planet outside the Earth's solar system is taking issue with people who shrug off climate change on the grounds that humans will eventually leave for distant planets. Didier Queloz was one of several Nobel...
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Nobel chemistry winner John B. Goodenough poses for the media at the Royal Society in London, Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019. The 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino for the development of lithium-ion batteries. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)
October 09, 2019 - 12:40 pm
STOCKHOLM (AP) — If you're reading this on a cellphone or laptop computer, you might thank this year's three winners of the Nobel Prize in chemistry for their work on lithium-ion batteries. The batteries developed by the British, American and Japanese winners are far more revolutionary than just...
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This combination of Oct. 8, 2019, photos shows the Nobel Prize winners in Physics, from left, James Peebles in Princeton, N.J., Didier Queloz in London and Michel Mayor in Madrid. Peebles, an emeritus professor at Princeton University, won for his theoretical discoveries in cosmology. Swiss star-gazers Mayor, and Queloz, both of the University of Geneva, were honored for finding an exoplanet — a planet outside our solar system — that orbits a sun-like star, the Nobel committee said. (AP Photo)
October 08, 2019 - 12:12 pm
STOCKHOLM (AP) — A Canadian American cosmologist and two Swiss scientists won this year's Nobel Prize in Physics on Tuesday for exploring the evolution of the universe and discovering a new kind of planet, with implications for that nagging question: Does life exist only on Earth? Canadian-born...
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Ulf Danielsson, member of the Nobel committee talks during the announcement of the winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics during news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on Tuesday Oct. 8, 2019. The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics is awarded to James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz. (Claudio Bresciani / TT via AP)
October 08, 2019 - 8:03 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Latest on the Nobel Prize in Physics (all times local): 2:30 p.m. A University of Cambridge astronomer says the work that earned three scientists the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics "highlights astronomy as the grandest of the environmental sciences." Emeritus Professor Martin Rees...
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September 11, 2019 - 12:17 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — In a tantalizing first, scientists have discovered water at a planet outside our solar system that has temperatures suitable for life. London researchers announced Wednesday they've found water vapor in the atmosphere of a planet 110 light-years away. This so-called...
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FILE - In this July 14, 2019, file photo, a telescope at the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii's tallest mountain is viewed. Astronomers across 11 observatories on Hawaii’s tallest mountain have cancelled more than 2,000 hours of telescope viewing over the past four weeks because a protest blocked a road to the summit. Astronomers said Friday, Aug. 9, 2019, they will attempt to resume observations but in some cases won’t be able to make up the missed research. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
August 10, 2019 - 7:18 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Asteroids, including those that might slam into Earth. Clouds of gas and dust on the verge of forming stars. Planets orbiting stars other than our own. This is some of the research astronomers say they have missed out on at 11 observatories on Hawaii's tallest mountain as a protest...
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FILE - In this Sunday, July 14, 2019, file photo, the sun sets behind telescopes at the summit of Mauna Kea. Scientists are expected to explore fundamental questions about our universe when they use a giant new telescope planned for the summit of Hawaii’s tallest mountain. That includes whether there’s life outside our solar system and how stars and galaxies formed in the earliest years of the universe. But some Native Hawaiians don’t want the Thirty Meter Telescope to be built at Mauna Kea’s summit, saying it will further harm a place they consider sacred. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
July 19, 2019 - 9:06 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Is there life on planets outside our solar system? How did stars and galaxies form in the earliest years of the universe? How do black holes shape galaxies? Scientists are expected to explore those and other fundamental questions about the universe when they peer deep into the night...
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