Environment

Bill Moore cross-country skis down a street on Sunday, Jan. 20, 2019, in Montpelier, Vt. A major winter storm that blanketed most of the Midwest with snow earlier in the weekend barreled toward New England Sunday, where it was expected to cause transportation havoc ranging from slick and clogged roads to hundreds of cancelled airline flights. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)
January 20, 2019 - 9:22 am
BOSTON (AP) — A major winter storm that has brought some of the coldest temperatures of the season covered a large swath of the U.S. in snow as it wreaked havoc on air travel and caused slick road conditions throughout New England Sunday. Nearly 5,000 flights were canceled Sunday around the country...
Read More
This image provided by the Humane Society of the United States shows a painting on elephant hide for sale at the Safari Club International conference in Reno, Nev., on Jan. 9, 2019. Photos and video taken by animal welfare activists show an array of potentially illicit products crafted from the body parts of threatened big-game animals, including boots, chaps, belts and furniture labeled as elephant leather. The artist told the activists on a video they recorded that the painting was on elephant hide. (Humane Society of the United States via AP)
January 19, 2019 - 11:10 am
RENO, Nev. (AP) — Photos and video taken by animal welfare activists at a recent trophy hunting convention show an array of products crafted from the body parts of threatened big-game animals, including boots, chaps, belts and furniture labeled as elephant leather. Vendors at the Safari Club...
Read More
FILE - In this June 25, 2014 file photo, a group of immigrants from Honduras and El Salvador, who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally, are stopped in Granjeno, Texas. During the longest-ever government shutdown, the federal judiciary has remained open, allowing the wheels of justice to keep turning in most criminal cases. In November, after a federal judge in California blocked the Trump administration from enforcing a ban on asylum for immigrants who illegally cross the southern border, government attorneys hurriedly asked a federal appeals court, then the U.S. Supreme Court, to suspend the order, terming illegal border crossings an "ongoing and increasing crisis." Both courts denied the government's request. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
January 19, 2019 - 10:12 am
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — During the longest-ever government shutdown, the federal judiciary has remained open, allowing the wheels of justice to keep turning in most criminal cases. But many civil cases have come to a halt because the U.S. Department of Justice doesn't have enough attorneys working to...
Read More
January 18, 2019 - 10:57 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A federal judge has found four women guilty of entering a national wildlife refuge without a permit as they sought to place food and water in the Arizona desert for migrants. U.S. Magistrate Judge Bernardo Velasco's ruling Friday marked the first conviction against humanitarian aid...
Read More
FILE- In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, an endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in Puget Sound west of Seattle, Wash. For years, scientists have identified dams, pollution and vessel noise as causes of the troubling decline of the Pacific Northwest's resident killer whales. Now, they may have found a new and more surprising culprit: pink salmon. Salmon researchers perusing data on the website of the Center for Whale Research noticed a startling trend: that for the past two decades, significantly more of the whales have died in even-numbered years than in odd years. In a newly published paper, they speculate that the pattern is related to pink salmon, which return to the waters between Washington state and Canada in enormous numbers every other year. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
January 18, 2019 - 4:52 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Over the years, scientists have identified dams, pollution and vessel noise as causes of the troubling decline of the Pacific Northwest's resident killer whales. Now, they may have found a new and more surprising culprit: pink salmon. Four salmon researchers were perusing orca data...
Read More
In this Jan. 15, 2019 photo provided by Juan Oliphant, Ocean Ramsey, a shark researcher and advocate, swims with a large great white shark off the shore of Oahu. Ramsey told The Associated Press on Thursday, Jan. 17 that images of her swimming next to a huge great white shark prove that these top predators should be protected, not feared. (Juan Oliphant via AP)
January 18, 2019 - 1:45 pm
HALEIWA, Hawaii (AP) — Two shark researchers who came face to face with what could be one of the largest great whites ever recorded are using their encounter as an opportunity to push for legislation that would protect sharks in Hawaii. Ocean Ramsey, a shark researcher and conservationist, told The...
Read More
FILE- In a Feb. 5, 2018, file photo, defendant Liane Shekter-Smith, 57, listens during a preliminary examination in the cases of four defendants, all former or current officials from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality in Flint, Mich. Shekter-Smith, Michael Prysby and Stephen Busch of the MDEQ recently accepted plea deals in the Flint water criminal investigation. Some Flint residents are upset, saying key people who could have stopped the lead disaster in 2014-15 are getting off easy. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP, File)
January 18, 2019 - 1:14 pm
DETROIT (AP) — Fifteen people have been charged in an investigation of how Flint's water became contaminated with lead in 2014-15 and a related outbreak of Legionnaires' disease. Seven people have pleaded no contest to misdemeanors in deals that will leave them without a criminal record. — Michael...
Read More
FILE - In this June 14, 2017 file photo, Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette fields questions from reporters in Flint, Mich., after announcing charges against five water officials with manslaughter related to their alleged failure to act during the Flint water crisis. In 2016, Schuette promised to investigate the Flint water scandal “without fear or favor” and pledged that state regulators would be locked up for fudging data and misleading the public about lead in the poor city’s pipes. Yet three years later, no one is behind bars. (Jake May/The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP, File)
January 18, 2019 - 1:13 pm
DETROIT (AP) — Michigan's attorney general in 2016 promised to investigate "without fear or favor" the scandal over Flint's lead-tainted drinking water and pledged that state regulators would be locked up for fudging data and misleading the public. Yet three years later, no one is behind bars...
Read More
FILE - In this March 31, 2016 file photo, Tesla Motors unveils the new lower-priced Model 3 sedan at the Tesla Motors design studio in Hawthorne, Calif. Tesla, recognizing as imperative its ability to produce a cheaper electric car, told employees Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 that it must cut 7 percent of its workforce. Tesla’s cheapest model right now is the $44,000 Model 3, and it needs to broaden its customer base to survive. (AP Photo/Justin Pritchard)
January 18, 2019 - 12:44 pm
Tesla will cut 7 percent of its workforce as it tries to lower prices and break out of the niche-car market to produce an electric vehicle that more people can afford. Tesla's cheapest model right now is the $44,000 Model 3, and it needs to broaden its customer base to survive. "Looking ahead at...
Read More
A woman works on a giant poster reading 'Climate Strike' during the 'Youth For Climate' strike protest in front of the Reichstag building in Berlin, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
January 18, 2019 - 9:29 am
BERLIN (AP) — Thousands of students held rallies Friday across Germany and Switzerland to protest the lack of action against climate change. The demonstrations in dozens of cities were inspired by student Greta Thunberg , who has been staging a weekly "school strike" in Sweden. Many used the...
Read More

Pages