Droughts

FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2017, file photo, the Eagle Creek wildfire burns on the Oregon side of the Columbia River Gorge near Cascade Locks, Ore. An Oregon lawmaker has lashed out at restrictions on logging, blaming them for the intensity of wildfires plaguing much of the U.S. West. (Genna Martin /seattlepi.com via AP)
September 08, 2017 - 2:06 am
DENVER (AP) — Acrid yellow smoke clogs the skies of major Western U.S. cities, a human-caused fire in the Columbia River Gorge rains ash on Portland, Oregon, and a century-old backcountry chalet burns to the ground in Montana's Glacier National Park. Wildfires are chewing across dried-out Western...
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FILE--This Monday, Sept. 4, 2017, file photo provided by KATU-TV shows a wildfire as seen from near Stevenson Wash., across the Columbia River, burning in the Columbia River Gorge above Cascade Locks, Ore. The fast-moving wildfire chewing through Oregon's Columbia River Gorge is threatening more than homes and people. It's also devouring the heart of the state's nature-loving identity. (Tristan Fortsch/KATU-TV via AP, file)
September 08, 2017 - 12:14 am
DENVER (AP) — Acrid yellow smoke clogs the skies of major Western U.S. cities, a human-caused fire in the Columbia River Gorge rains ash on Portland, Oregon, and a century-old backcountry chalet burns to the ground in Montana's Glacier National Park. Wildfires are chewing across dried-out Western...
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FILE--This Monday, Sept. 4, 2017, file photo provided by KATU-TV shows a wildfire as seen from near Stevenson Wash., across the Columbia River, burning in the Columbia River Gorge above Cascade Locks, Ore. The fast-moving wildfire chewing through Oregon's Columbia River Gorge is threatening more than homes and people. It's also devouring the heart of the state's nature-loving identity. (Tristan Fortsch/KATU-TV via AP, file)
September 07, 2017 - 6:54 pm
DENVER (AP) — Acrid yellow smoke clogs the skies of major Western U.S. cities, a human-caused fire races down the Columbia River Gorge toward Portland, Oregon, and a century-old backcountry chalet burns to the ground in Montana's Glacier National Park. Wildfires are chewing across dried-out Western...
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A view of the Tiber river, whose level is particularly low due to an ongoing drought, on Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. Municipal water company ACEA announced Monday that they will reduce the water pressure at night in Rome and Fiumicino due to the ongoing drought. (Giorgio Onorati/ANSA via AP)
August 29, 2017 - 7:30 am
ROME (AP) — Rome's water utility is planning to reduce water pressure in factories and buildings across the capital in its latest effort to combat the effects of a nationwide drought that has parched reservoirs and wreaked havoc on Italian agriculture. Acea said the night-time reductions would...
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FILE - In this July 28, 2014 file photo, lightning strikes over Lake Mead near Hoover Dam at the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Arizona. Federal water managers are due to release a crucial report Tuesday projecting whether Arizona and Nevada will face restrictions next year and in 2019 on drinking water supplies from the Lake Mead reservoir on the Colorado River. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
August 15, 2017 - 6:24 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Heavy winter snows in the Rocky Mountains have rescued the thirsty Western U.S. for another year. U.S. water managers said Tuesday there will be no water cutbacks in 2018 for millions of residents and farmers served by the Lake Mead reservoir on the Colorado River that lies behind...
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FILE - In this July 28, 2014 file photo, lightning strikes over Lake Mead near Hoover Dam at the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Arizona. Federal water managers are due to release a crucial report Tuesday projecting whether Arizona and Nevada will face restrictions next year and in 2019 on drinking water supplies from the Lake Mead reservoir on the Colorado River. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
August 15, 2017 - 5:23 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Heavy winter snows in the Rocky Mountains have rescued the thirsty Western U.S. for another year. U.S. water managers said Tuesday there will be no water cutbacks in 2018 for millions of residents and farmers served by the Lake Mead reservoir on the Colorado River that lies behind...
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FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2007 file photo, a worker picks grapes for harvest in the vineyards of Castelcerino, above the village of Soave, Northern Italy. The Italian wine grape harvest is having its earliest start in a decade due to the effects of the summer 2017 heatwave and drought. (AP Photo/Martino Masotto, file)
August 04, 2017 - 10:24 am
COCCAGLIO, Italy (AP) — The Italian wine grape harvest is having its earliest start in a decade due to the effects of the summer's heatwave and drought. Producers of bubbly spumante in the Franciacorta area of Lombardy, some 80 kilometers (50 miles) east of Milan in northern Italy, officially...
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August 04, 2017 - 9:34 am
COCCAGLIO, Italy (AP) — The Italian wine grape harvest is having its earliest start in a decade due to the effects of the summer's heatwave and drought. Producers of bubbly spumante in the Franciacorta area of Lombardy, some 80 kilometers (50 miles) east of Milan in northern Italy, officially...
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This photo provided by the Santa Barbara County Fire Department shows Rancho Alegre Outdoor School, a camp which suffered extensive damage from the Whittier fire near Santa Barbara, Calif., Monday, July 7, 2017. In Southern California, thousands of people remained out of their homes as a pair of fires raged at different ends of Santa Barbara County. The fires broke out amid a blistering weekend heat wave that toppled temperature records. (Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP)
July 11, 2017 - 11:12 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Timber and brush parched from a years-long dry spell and thick grass that grew after drought-busting winter downpours are making for early and unpredictable wildfire behavior that California officials haven't seen for years, if at all. Dense layers of new grass are providing a "...
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In this photo of Friday June 9, 2017, Ader Ali Yusuf, center, a mother of 12 who was displaced from her village due to the ongoing drought in Ethiopia, sits among a group of women as an international delegation visits the Warder town of Ethiopia's drought stricken area near the border with Somalia. Ethiopia's government is warning it will run out of emergency food aid starting next month as the number of drought victims in the East African country has reached 7.8 million. (AP Photo/Elias Meseret )
June 10, 2017 - 5:56 am
WARDER, Ethiopia (AP) — Ethiopia's government is warning it will run out of emergency food aid starting next month as the number of drought victims in the East African country has reached 7.8 million. An international delegation visited one of the worst-affected areas Friday near the border with...
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