Doping

Former president of the IAAF (International Association of Athletics Federations) Lamine Diack, center, arrives at the Paris courthouse, Monday, June 8, 2020. A sweeping sports corruption trial opened Monday in Paris involving allegations of a massive doping cover-up that reached to the top of world track and field's governing body. Lamine Diack, 87, who served as president of the body for nearly 16 years, is among those accused of receiving money from Russian athletes to hide their suspected doping so they could compete at the Olympics in 2012 and other competitions. His son Papa Massata Diack is also charged in the case. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
June 18, 2020 - 5:21 am
PARIS (AP) — As Usain Bolt set the world ablaze, making athletics the hottest ticket at the Olympic Games, the sport was also being eaten from within. That grim picture has emerged from a corruption trial in Paris that has shown how the thrilling era for track fans was poisoned behind the scenes by...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 28, 2019, file photo, Christian Coleman, of the United States, poses after winning the men's 100 meter race during the World Athletics Championships in Doha, Qatar. Reigning world champion Coleman insists a simple phone call from drug testers while he was out Christmas shopping could’ve prevented the latest misunderstanding about his whereabouts, one he fears could lead to a suspension. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
June 17, 2020 - 3:23 am
Christian Coleman, the reigning world champion in the 100-meter dash, was suspended Wednesday by the Athletics Integrity Unit for missing drug tests. The AIU updated its list of athletes on provisional suspension to include Coleman, hours after the American sprinter revealed details of the case. He...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 28, 2019, file photo, Christian Coleman, of the United States, poses after winning the men's 100 meter race during the World Athletics Championships in Doha, Qatar. Reigning world champion Coleman insists a simple phone call from drug testers while he was out Christmas shopping could’ve prevented the latest misunderstanding about his whereabouts, one he fears could lead to a suspension. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
June 16, 2020 - 9:26 pm
Reigning world champion Christian Coleman insists a simple phone call from drug testers while he was out Christmas shopping could’ve prevented the latest misunderstanding about his whereabouts — one he fears could lead to a suspension. The 24-year-old American sprinter detailed his latest missed...
Read More
FILE - In this Nov. 17, 2012, file photo, an Arizona State fan is all alone in the upper deck during an NCAA college football game against Washington State, in Tempe, Ariz. As lock-downs are lifted, restrictions on social gatherings eased and life begins to resemble some sense, sports are finally starting to emerge from the coronavirus pandemic. Many college and pro sports teams already were dealing with declining ticket sales. The improved at-home experience, the emergence of wide-spread legalized betting and the changing social makeup of fan bases have been catalysts, while dynamic pricing, increases in parking and concession prices and a push toward luxury seating have exacerbated the problem.(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
June 16, 2020 - 9:45 am
The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world: ___ Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola says he will not hold Kyle Walker’s lockdown indiscretions against him when the Premier League resumes on Wednesday. Walker apologized for hosting a party at his home during...
Read More
Daniel Berger poses with the championship trophy after winning the Charles Schwab Challenge golf tournament after a playoff round at the Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas, Sunday, June 14, 2020. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
June 15, 2020 - 2:07 am
FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — The PGA Tour spent two months learning about the COVID-19 pandemic and trying to develop a safe plan to return, followed by another month hoping for the best. Commissioner Jay Monahan said his confidence in the plan came with a dose of uncertainty. “If we ... got into a...
Read More
Former president of the IAAF (International Association of Athletics Federations) Lamine Diack, left, arrives at the Paris courthouse, Wednesday, June 10, 2020. A sweeping sports corruption trial opened Monday in Paris involving allegations of a massive doping cover-up that reached to the top of world track and field's governing body. Lamine Diack, 87, who served as president of the body for nearly 16 years, is among those accused of receiving money from Russian athletes to hide their suspected doping so they could compete at the Olympics in 2012 and other competitions. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
June 11, 2020 - 1:06 pm
PARIS (AP) — Former IAAF president Lamine Diack pointed a finger of blame at his son, saying he behaved like “a thug,” as he was quizzed in detail for the first time in court Thursday on charges that the governing body of track and field became a nest of corruption and doping cover-ups under his...
Read More
Former president of the IAAF (International Association of Athletics Federations) Lamine Diack arrives with his lawyer William Bourdon, right, at the Paris courthouse, Monday, June 8, 2020. A sweeping sports corruption trial opened Monday in Paris involving allegations of a massive doping cover-up that reached to the top of world track and field's governing body. Lamine Diack, 87, who served as president of the body for nearly 16 years, is among those accused of receiving money from Russian athletes to hide their suspected doping so they could compete at the Olympics in 2012 and other competitions. His son Papa Massata Diack is also charged in the case. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
June 08, 2020 - 5:32 am
PARIS (AP) — A sports corruption trial involving allegations of doping cover-ups and illicit payoffs at the top of track and field opened Monday in Paris. In six days of hearings, the Paris court will weigh evidence that Russian athletes paid millions of dollars to hide their suspected doping so...
Read More
In this Friday, May 22, 2020 photo, Bob Baffert, two-time Triple Crown-winning trainer, lowers his bandana during an interview while keeping his distance at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, Calif. Horse racing returned to the track after being idled for one and a half months because of public health officials' concerns about the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Ashley Landis)
May 26, 2020 - 11:50 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Two horses from the barn of two-time Triple Crown-winning trainer Bob Baffert have tested positive for a banned substance, according to published reports. The New York Times and Louisville Courier-Journal on Tuesday cited unidentified sources in reporting the positive tests...
Read More
FILE - In this July 26, 2018, file photo, former Los Angeles Laker Kobe Bryant and his daughter Gianna watch during the U.S. national championships swimming meet in Irvine, Calif. Autopsy reports released Friday, May 15, 2020, show that the pilot who flew Bryant did not have drugs or alcohol in his system when the helicopter crashed in Southern California in January, killing all nine aboard. The causes of death for Bryant, his 13-year-old daughter Gianna, pilot Ara Zobayan and the others have been ruled blunt force trauma. Federal authorities are still investigating the crash. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)
AP News
May 15, 2020 - 9:50 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The pilot flying Kobe Bryant and seven others to a youth basketball tournament did not have alcohol or drugs in his system, and all nine sustained immediately fatal injuries when their helicopter slammed into a hillside outside Los Angeles in January, according to autopsies...
Read More
CORRECTS THE SOURCE IN THE CAPTION SIGNOFF TO JAY BHATTACHARYA, NOT MLB - This selfie photo taken by Dr. Jay Bhattacharya, a professor at Stanford University, shows himself in Stanford, Calif., Sunday, May 10, 2020. Just 0.7% of Major League Baseball employees tested positive for antibodies to COVID-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus. "It allows us to get a peek of the nation-wide prevalence," said Bhattacharya, one of the study's leaders, said Sunday. (Jay Bhattacharya via AP)
May 11, 2020 - 12:31 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Just 0.7% of Major League Baseball employees tested positive for antibodies to COVID-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus. The small number of positive tests, announced Sunday, was positive news for a sport pushing ahead with plans to start its delayed season. Researchers...
Read More

Pages