Data privacy

FILE - In this Feb. 28, 2018 photo, Matty Nev Luby holds her phone and logs into the lip-sync smartphone app Musical.ly, in Wethersfield, Conn. The operator of the video-sharing app popular with teenagers has agreed to pay $5.7 million to settle federal allegations it illegally collected personal information from children. The Federal Trade Commission said Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019, it’s penalty against lip-syncing app Musical.ly, now known as TikTok, is the largest ever obtained in a children’s privacy case. The FTC says the app violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act requiring kid-oriented websites to get parents’ consent before collecting personal information from children under 13. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
February 27, 2019 - 2:58 pm
The operator of a video-sharing app popular with teenagers agreed to pay $5.7 million to settle federal allegations it illegally collected personal information from children. The Federal Trade Commission said the Wednesday penalty against lip-syncing app Musical.ly, now known as TikTok, is the...
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FILE - In this May 18, 2012, file photo a television photographer shoots the sign outside of Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. A parliamentary committee report published Sunday, Feb. 17, 2019, has recommended that the United Kingdom government increase oversight of social media platforms like Facebook to better control harmful or illegal content. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
February 18, 2019 - 7:26 am
LONDON (AP) — British lawmakers issued a scathing report Monday that calls for tougher rules to keep Facebook and other tech firms from acting like "digital gangsters" and intentionally violating data privacy and competition laws. The report on fake news and disinformation on social media sites...
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FILE - This March 23, 2018, file photo shows an envelope containing a 2018 census letter mailed to a U.S. resident as part of the nation's only test run of the 2020 Census. The Supreme Court will decide whether the 2020 census can include a question about citizenship that could affect the allocation of seats in the House of Representatives and the distribution of billions of dollars in federal money.(AP Photo/Michelle R. Smith, File)
February 16, 2019 - 6:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — An internal team at the Census Bureau found that basic personal information collected from more than 100 million Americans during the 2010 head count could be reconstructed from obscured data, but with lots of mistakes, a top agency official disclosed Saturday. The age, gender,...
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FILE - This Feb. 19, 2014, file photo shows the Facebook app icon on an iPhone in New York. Apple says it has banned a Facebook-made app that paid users, including teenagers, to extensively track their data. The app, Facebook Research, tracked people’s phone and web activity in exchange for payments. A report in the tech blog TechCrunch on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019, says Facebook paid about $20 a month in exchange for people letting it track their phone activities. While Facebook says this was done with permission, the company has a history of defining “permission” loosely and obscuring what sort of data it collects. (AP Photo/Karly Domb Sadof, File)
January 30, 2019 - 7:42 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Apple says Facebook can no longer distribute an app that paid users, including teenagers, to extensively track their phone and web use. In doing so, Apple closed off Facebook's efforts to sidestep Apple's app store and its tighter rules on privacy. The tech blog TechCrunch reported...
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FILE- In this May 1, 2018, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the keynote speech at F8, Facebook's developer conference, in San Jose, Calif. Facebook may be facing the biggest fine ever imposed by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission for privacy violations that breached a commitment to protect the personal information of its social network’s 2.2 billion users. The Washington Post reported, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019, that the FTC is considering hitting Facebook with a penalty that would top its previous record fine of $22.5 million dealt to Google in 2012. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
January 18, 2019 - 3:01 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook may be facing the biggest fine ever imposed by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission for privacy violations involving the personal information of its 2.2 billion users. The FTC is considering hitting Facebook with a penalty that would top its previous record fine of $22.5...
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FILE - This Jan. 28, 2015, file photo, shows the Federal Trade Commission building in Washington. Consumer advocates and the data-hungry technology industry are drawing early battle lines in advance of an expected fight over a national privacy law. Privacy organizations on Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, suggested sidelining the Federal Trade Commission with a new data-protection agency empowered to police U.S. industry. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
January 16, 2019 - 11:25 pm
Consumer advocates and the data-hungry technology industry are drawing early battle lines in advance of an expected fight this year over what kind of federal privacy law the U.S. should have. On Thursday, more than a dozen privacy organizations unveiled a plan that would create a new federal data-...
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WWL AP Feed General
January 10, 2019 - 4:05 am
LONDON (AP) — An adviser to Europe's top court says Google doesn't have to extend "right to be forgotten" rules to its search engines globally. The European Court of Justice's advocate general released a preliminary opinion Thursday in the case involving the U.S. tech company and France's data...
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WWL AP Feed General
December 19, 2018 - 12:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The District of Columbia sued Facebook on Wednesday for allowing data-mining firm Cambridge Analytica to improperly access data from as many as 87 million users. D.C. Attorney General Karl Racine's suit alleges that Facebook misled users about the security of their data and failed...
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FILE - In this March 15, 2013, file photo, a man walks past a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, California, USA. Facebook gave some companies more extensive access to users’ personal data than it has previously revealed, letting them read private messages or see the names of friends without consent, according to a New York Times report published Wednesday Dec. 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
December 19, 2018 - 8:36 am
Facebook gave some companies more extensive access to users' personal data than it has previously revealed, letting them read private messages or see the names of friends without consent, according to a New York Times report. The newspaper on Wednesday detailed special arrangements between Facebook...
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People talk inside a Facebook “pop-up” trailer in New York’s Bryan Park on Thursday, Dec. 13, 2018. The company hosted a one-day event open to the public, with Facebook employees on hand to answer questions about privacy settings and other issues. The pop-up event caps a difficult year for the company.(AP Photo/Barbara Ortutay)
December 14, 2018 - 11:37 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook says a software bug affecting nearly 7 million users may have exposed a broader set of photos to app developers than what these users intended. Although this doesn't mean the photos were actually seen by anyone, the fact that the bug even existed offers a reminder of just...
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