Cancer

Second lady of the United States Karen Pence speaks during an interview with the Associated Press at the residence of U.S ambassador to Japan in Tokyo, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
November 13, 2018 - 1:31 am
TOKYO (AP) — Karen Pence, the U.S. vice president's wife, announced Tuesday a $54,000 U.S. grant to a teacher at Tsukuba University in Japan for the study of art therapy, a little-known mental health profession she has championed under the Trump administration. Pence was in Japan while accompanying...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012 file photo, a pedestrian talking on a cellphone is silhouetted in front of a fountain in Philadelphia. Two U.S. government agencies are giving conflicting interpretations of a safety study on cellphone radiation: One says it causes cancer in rats. The other says there's no reason for people to worry. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
November 01, 2018 - 4:37 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Two U.S. government agencies are giving conflicting interpretations of a safety study on cellphone radiation: One says it causes cancer in rats. The other says there's no reason for people to worry. The National Toxicology Program dialed up its concerns Thursday about a link to...
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FILE - In this Aug. 10, 2018 file photo, Dewayne Johnson reacts after hearing the verdict in his case against Monsanto at the Superior Court of California in San Francisco. A Northern California groundskeeper says he will accept a judge's reduced verdict of $78 million against Monsanto after a jury found the company's weed killer caused his cancer. DeWayne Johnson's attorney informed the San Francisco Superior Court on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. (Josh Edelson/Pool Photo via AP, File)
October 31, 2018 - 7:04 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A Northern California groundskeeper said Wednesday that he will accept a judge's reduced verdict of $78 million against Monsanto after a jury found the company's weed killer caused his cancer. DeWayne Johnson's attorney formally informed the San Francisco Superior Court that he...
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This undated family photo provided in October 2018 shows Alicia Ackley, of Alvin, Texas. Diagnosed with cervical cancer in July 2018, she followed the advice of her doctor and had a traditional open hysterectomy rather than the minimally invasive version. Some hospitals are changing their practice after studies found women who had less invasive surgery for cervical cancer fared worse. (Courtesy Alicia Ackley via AP)
October 31, 2018 - 4:02 pm
New evidence about a cancer operation in women finds a higher death rate for the less invasive version. The unexpected findings are prompting changes at some hospitals that perform radical hysterectomies for early-stage cervical cancer. Researchers compared two types of radical hysterectomy. Women...
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October 31, 2018 - 6:34 am
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — There is a sigh of relief after police recovered a giant inflatable colon that is used to teach about the dangers of colon cancer. Kansas City, Missouri, police on Tuesday announced on Twitter a tip led officers to locate the "pilfered intestine" inside a vacant house. The...
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FILE - This undated fluorescence-colored microscope image made available by the National Institutes of Health in September 2016 shows a culture of human breast cancer cells. For the first time, one of the new immunotherapy drugs has shown promise against breast cancer in a large study that combined it with chemotherapy to treat an aggressive form of the disease. Results were discussed Saturday, Oct. 20, 2018 at a European Society for Medical Oncology conference in Munich and published by the New England Journal of Medicine. (Ewa Krawczyk/National Cancer Institute via AP)
October 20, 2018 - 11:01 am
For the first time, one of the new immunotherapy drugs has shown promise against breast cancer in a large study that combined it with chemotherapy to treat an aggressive form of the disease. But the benefit for most women was small, raising questions about whether the treatment is worth its high...
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This undated image provided by Merck on Friday, Oct. 5, 2018 shows a vial and packaging for the Gardasil 9 vaccine. On Friday, Oct. 5, 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration expanded the use of the company's cervical cancer vaccine to adults up to age 45. (Merck via AP)
October 05, 2018 - 5:25 pm
U.S. regulators Friday expanded the use of Merck's cervical cancer vaccine to adults up to age 45. The vaccine was previously only for preteens and young adults through 26. The Food and Drug Administration approved Gardasil 9 for women and men through 45. The vaccine protects against the human...
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George P. Smith talks on the phone with The Associated Press at his home in Columbia, Mo., Wednesday Oct. 3, 2018, after learning he had won the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Frances Arnold of the California Institute of Technology, Smith of the University of Missouri and Gregory Winter of the MRC molecular biology lab in Cambridge, England were announced winners of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry by The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences on Wednesday. (Marjorie Sable via AP)
October 03, 2018 - 4:36 pm
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Three scientists won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for using a sped-up version of evolution to create new proteins that have led to a best-selling drug and other products. The Royal Swedish Academy of Science said their work has led to the development of medications,...
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Jim Hanzo
October 03, 2018 - 8:37 am
The FDA reports an increase of teens who use e-cigarettes and they're calling it an epidemic. The FDA said it was cracking down hard on sales of vaping products to teenagers and might consider taking e-cigarettes off the market if makers don't do more to stop the more rapidly growing sales to teens...
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FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2013, file photo, a CT scan technician prepares for a patient at the Silver Cross Emergency Care Center in Homer Glen, Ill. The Trump administration is quietly trying to weaken radiation rules, relying on scientific outliers who argue that a little radiation damage is actually good for you _ like a little bit of sunlight. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)
October 03, 2018 - 3:25 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The EPA is pursuing rule changes that experts say would weaken the way radiation exposure is regulated, turning to scientific outliers who argue that a bit of radiation damage is actually good for you — like a little bit of sunlight. The government's current, decades-old guidance...
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