Astronomy

FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015 file photo made available by SpaceX, their Dragon capsule sits aboard a ship in the Pacific Ocean west of Mexico's Baja Peninsula after returning from the International Space Station, carrying about 3,700 lbs of cargo for NASA. SpaceX announced Monday, Feb. 27, 2017 that it would send two paying customers to the moon next year on a private flight aboard its Dragon capsule. The company said the unnamed customers have paid “a significant deposit” for the moon trip.(AP Photo/SpaceX, File)
February 27, 2017 - 5:49 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — SpaceX said Monday it will fly two people to the moon next year, a feat not attempted since NASA's Apollo heyday close to half a century ago. Tech billionaire Elon Musk — the company's founder and chief executive officer — announced the surprising news barely a week...
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In this image from NASA TV, the SpaceX Falcon rocket launches from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Sunday, Feb. 19, 2017. It's carrying a load of supplies for the International Space Station. (NASA TV via AP)
February 19, 2017 - 11:56 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A SpaceX rocket soared from NASA's long-idled moonshot pad Sunday, sending up space station supplies from the exact spot where astronauts embarked on the lunar landings nearly a half-century ago. It was the first flight from NASA's legendary Launch Complex 39A since the...
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In this image from NASA TV, the SpaceX Falcon rocket launches from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Sunday, Feb. 19, 2017. It's carrying a load of supplies for the International Space Station. (NASA TV via AP)
February 19, 2017 - 9:44 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A SpaceX rocket soared from NASA's long-idled moonshot pad Sunday, sending up space station supplies from the exact spot where astronauts embarked on the lunar landings nearly a half-century ago. It was the first flight from NASA's legendary Launch Complex 39A since the...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2010 file photo, photographers prepare to make photos of the space shuttle Discovery at launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Dormant for nearly six years, Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center should see its first commercial flight in February 2017. A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will use the pad to hoist supplies for the International Space Station. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
February 17, 2017 - 4:07 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The launch pad used to send Americans to the moon and shuttle astronauts into orbit is roaring back into action. Dormant for nearly six years, NASA's Launch Complex 39A should see its first commercial flight this weekend. A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will use it to hoist...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2010 file photo, photographers prepare to make photos of the space shuttle Discovery at launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Dormant for nearly six years, Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center should see its first commercial flight in February 2017. A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will use the pad to hoist supplies for the International Space Station. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
February 17, 2017 - 11:27 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The launch pad used to send Americans to the moon and shuttle astronauts into orbit is roaring back into action. Dormant for nearly six years, Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center should see its first commercial flight this weekend. A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket...
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Scoot
February 10, 2017 - 6:54 am
Tonight a full moon will hang in the sky and there will be much speculation that it will have an effect on human behavior. But does a full moon really inspire lunacy? I did some research and discovered some interesting information about full moons and human behavior. The moon has always been a...
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In this photo provided by the University of Hawaii, scientists Joshua Ehrlich, from left, Laura Lark, Sam Payler, Brian Ramos, Jay Bevington and Ansley Barnard, pose for a photo before they enter a geodesic dome called Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, or HI-SEAS located 8,200 feet above sea level on Mauna Loa on the island of Hawaii, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017. The four men and two women moved into their new simulated space home Thursday afternoon, as part of a human-behavior study that could help NASA as it draws up plans for sending astronauts on long missions to Mars. (University of Hawaii via AP)
January 20, 2017 - 1:20 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Crammed into a dome with one bathroom, six scientists will spend eight months munching on mostly freeze-dried foods — with a rare treat of Spam — and have only their small sleeping quarters to retreat to for solace. The simulated stay on Mars with a carefully selected crew of...
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In this photo provided by the University of Hawaii, scientists Joshua Ehrlich, from left, Laura Lark, Sam Payler, Brian Ramos, Jay Bevington and Ansley Barnard, pose for a photo before they enter a geodesic dome called Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, or HI-SEAS located 8,200 feet above sea level on Mauna Loa on the island of Hawaii, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017. The four men and two women moved into their new simulated space home Thursday afternoon, as part of a human-behavior study that could help NASA as it draws up plans for sending astronauts on long missions to Mars. (University of Hawaii via AP)
January 20, 2017 - 8:17 am
HONOLULU (AP) — Crammed into a dome with one bathroom, six scientists will spend eight months munching on mostly freeze-dried foods — with a rare treat of Spam — and have only their small sleeping quarters to retreat to for solace. The simulated stay on Mars with a carefully selected crew of...
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In this May 23, 2014 photo provided by the University of Hawaii, Lucie Poulet, right, uses a geotechnical tool while Annie Caraccio records the data during a previous study outside the domed structure that will house six researchers for eight months in an environment meant to simulate an expedition to Mars, on Mauna Loa on the Big Island of Hawaii. The group will enter the dome Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017, and spend eight months together in the 1,200-square-foot research facility in a study called Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS). They will have no physical contact with any humans outside their group, experience a 20-minute delay in communications and are required to wear space suits whenever they leave the compound. (Ross Lockwood/University of Hawaii via AP)
January 19, 2017 - 9:11 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Six carefully selected scientists have entered a man-made dome on a remote Hawaii volcano as part of a human-behavior study that could help NASA as it draws up plans for sending astronauts on long missions to Mars. The four men and two women moved into their new simulated space home...
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In this May 23, 2014 photo provided by the University of Hawaii, Lucie Poulet, right, uses a geotechnical tool while Annie Caraccio records the data during a previous study outside the domed structure that will house six researchers for eight months in an environment meant to simulate an expedition to Mars, on Mauna Loa on the Big Island of Hawaii. The group will enter the dome Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017, and spend eight months together in the 1,200-square-foot research facility in a study called Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS). They will have no physical contact with any humans outside their group, experience a 20-minute delay in communications and are required to wear space suits whenever they leave the compound. (Ross Lockwood/University of Hawaii via AP)
January 19, 2017 - 9:28 am
HONOLULU (AP) — A group of NASA-funded researchers is poised to enter an isolated geodesic dome on a remote Hawaii volcano to study human behavior in long-term space exploration, including a planned voyage to Mars. The six scientists enter their new home Thursday on the Big Island's Mauna Loa...
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