Health News

FILE - In this March 14, 2019 file photograph, a Planned Parenthood supporter hosts an abortion rights button on her hat during a rally on the steps of the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. On Tuesday, March 19, 2019, Mississippi senators passed the final version of a bill that would ban most abortions once a fetal heartbeat can be detected, about six weeks into pregnancy. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)
March 21, 2019 - 1:14 pm
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant on Thursday signed one of the strictest abortion laws in the nation — a measure that bans most abortions once a fetal heartbeat can be detected, about six weeks into pregnancy. The New York-based Center for Reproductive Rights called the measure "...
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FILE - This Feb. 2, 2015, file photo, depicts a part of a U.S. $100 bill. A growing majority of Americans want greater government spending on health care, and the increase is being driven by both Democrats and Republicans. That’s according to new data from the General Social Survey. The survey finds a desire for more spending on many government functions, including education and assistance to the poor, as President Donald Trump’s latest budget plan proposes to cut programs that are popular with the public. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick, File)
March 21, 2019 - 11:17 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A growing majority of Americans want greater government spending on health care, and the increase is being driven by both Democrats and Republicans. That's according to new data from the General Social Survey, a widely respected trend survey that has been measuring views of...
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File-This Feb. 7, 2019, file photo shows Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin delivering the State of the Commonwealth address to a joint session of the state legislature at the state Capitol in Frankfort, Ky. Bevin says he deliberately exposed his children to chickenpox so they would catch the highly contagious disease and become immune. During a Tuesday, March 19, 2019, interview on Bowling Green radio station WKCT, Bevin said his children were "miserable for a few days" after contracting chickenpox but said "they all turned out fine." Bevin and his wife, Glenna, have nine children, four adopted. (AP Photo/Bryan Woolston, File)
March 20, 2019 - 6:45 pm
FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin said in a radio interview that he deliberately exposed his children to chickenpox so they would catch the highly contagious disease and become immune. During a Tuesday interview on Bowling Green radio station WKCT, Bevin said his children were "...
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FILE - In this Jan. 16, 2019 file photo, Andrew Wheeler is shown at a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing to be the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Wheeler is telling CBS News in an interview airing Wednesday morning that climate change is “an important issue,” but that most of the threats it poses are “50 to 75 years out.” (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
March 20, 2019 - 2:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Unsafe drinking water, not climate change, is the world's most immediate public health issue, Environmental Protection Agency administrator Andrew Wheeler contended Wednesday. Environmental groups responded by saying the Trump administration was neglecting — or worsening — both...
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This undated electron microscope image provided by William Miller of Baker University in March 2019 shows a tardigrade of the class Heterotardigrada, also known as a "water bear." The small animals, about the size of a period, are able to survive extreme heat, cold, radiation and even the vacuum of space. (William Miller via AP)
March 20, 2019 - 12:17 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth's ultimate survivors can weather extreme heat, cold, radiation and even the vacuum of space. Now the U.S. military hopes these tiny critters called tardigrades can teach us about true toughness. These animals are pipsqueaks, only about the size of a period. Under a...
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San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera, at podium, announces that he's cracking down on the sale of e-cigarettes that he says aggressively target youth, at a City Hall news conference Tuesday, march 19, 2019. Legislation to be introduced would ban the sale of e-cigarettes anywhere in the city and county of San Francisco until the FDA has reviewed the product for sale. (AP Photo/Janie Har)
March 19, 2019 - 7:36 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco is trying to crack down on electronic cigarettes that critics say aggressively target kids, with an official on Tuesday proposed what's believed to be the first U.S. ban on their sale until the federal government regulates vaping products. City Attorney Dennis...
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March 19, 2019 - 6:57 pm
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — The federal Medicaid agency described a November audit that said Louisiana's Medicaid expansion program may have spent as much as $85 million on ineligible enrollees as "deeply troubling" and said it could seek repayment of misspent money. The U.S. Centers for Medicare and...
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March 19, 2019 - 6:06 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first drug specifically developed for severe depression after childbirth. The agency on Tuesday approved Sage Therapeutics' Zulresso, an IV drug given over 2 ½ days. Sage said Zulresso will cost $34,000 without insurance,...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018 file photo, a researcher installs a fine glass pipette into a microscope in preparation for injecting embryos with Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA at a lab in Shenzhen in southern China's Guandong province. On Tuesday, March 19, 2019, an expert committee convened by the World Health Organization is calling for the U.N. health agency to create a global registry of scientists working on gene editing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
March 19, 2019 - 1:52 pm
GENEVA (AP) — A panel convened by the World Health Organization said it would be "irresponsible" for scientists to use gene editing for reproductive purposes, but stopped short of calling for a ban. The experts also called for the U.N. health agency to create a database of scientists working on...
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Jim Hanzo
March 19, 2019 - 9:09 am
You've heard that a low dose aspirin a day would help prevent a heart attack, but are doctors reversing the recommendation? The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association now suggest that the low dose aspirin could be linked to bleeding or major hemorrhages. Dr. Orlando...
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