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Scoot: Why the Catholic Church needs to change stance on same-sex marriage

Scoot
August 15, 2018 - 1:26 pm
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The Catholic Church’s judgment of same-sex marriage is standing in the way of the contrition necessary to earn back the credibility lost through the fallible practice of protecting pedophile priests.

At the time news broke that an Indianapolis Catholic school had issued an ultimatum to a high school guidance counselor to either resign or “dissolve” her marriage to a woman, a grand jury report hit the news that over 300 “predatory priests” sexually molested over 1,000 identified victims in the state of Pennsylvania.  The report includes information that church leaders covered up the incidents of sexual abuse.

In the face of this grand jury report, which confirms the reality that the Catholic Church covered up cases of abuse and protected pedophile priests, how can a Catholic high school demand that a high school guidance counselor resign or “dissolve” her marriage to a woman?  The time has come for the Catholic Church to cease its harsh judgment of same-sex marriage.

Even though changes in the church’s protocol of protecting pedophile priests have apparently advanced, the shadow cast on the entire Catholic Church can only be removed with the shining light of easing judgment of things, like same-sex marriage.

For those who will quote the Bible and argue that the Catholic Church has no choice but to follow the “written word of God,” I remind you that there is probably more in the “written word of God” that specifically condemns priests sexually abusing young boys than there is written about condemning same-sex marriage.  But that is not a convenient truth for those who pick-and-choose how they use the Bible to support their biases.

The tendency to cling to an anti-same-sex marriage position in the wake of how the church traditionally dealt with “predatory priests” defies logic and ultimately defies the prevailing messages in the Bible. 

When will the Catholic Church demonstrate an honest act of contrition through changing its damning judgment of others?

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