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Officiating error negates Saints touchdown vs. Rams

Amos Morale III
September 15, 2019 - 5:06 pm
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For the second-straight week, the New Orleans Saints were on the receiving end of an officiating error. This time, it cost the Saints a touchdown.

In the second quarter of New Orleans' matchup against the Los Angeles Rams, Cam Jordan appeared to score after recovering and returning a fumble forced by defensive lineman Trey Hendrickson. Referees initially ruled the play wasn't a fumble but rather an incomplete pass and blew the play dead during Jordan's return. After a review,  official determined that the ball was indeed fumbled but because the play was blown dead the Saints had to take the ball at the spot of the recovery.

FOX's rules analyst Mike Pereira said on the broadcast that officials should have let the play go since it was such a close play.  

The Saints ensuing drive stalled after Alvin Kamara was stuffed on a fourth-and-1.

The Rams kicked a field goal on their next drive and ended the first half up 6-3. Saints fans flooded social media with frustration as the error happened against the team the Saints were playing during the now infamous "NOLA No-Call." New Orleans ironically was the victim of an officiating error in the second quarter of their Monday Night Football win against the Houston Texans.

The Saints were looking to narrow the Texans 14-3 lead before the end of the first half and had the ball with less than two minutes to play. On third-and-17, with 48 seconds to play, Saints quarterback Drew Brees connected with receiver Michael Thomas for what was initially ruled a 16-yard gain. After a review, Thomas was ruled to have reached the line to gain. The Saints elected not to use a timeout and by rule there was a 10-second runoff. However, instead of the Saints having a first down at their own 47 with roughly 30 seconds to play, they were left with just 14 seconds.

RELATED: NFL admits error by officials in Saints Monday Night Football matchup 

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