Elections

FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2018 file photo, former Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks to supporters in Atlanta. Abrams has gone from losing the Georgia governor’s race to being a heavily recruited Democratic star. It’s a dramatic rise often fueled by the promotional spending of Fair Fight Action, a nonprofit she founded to promote voting rights. They can accept unlimited sums of money, which could be a problem if she runs for office again. There is no proof of illegal activity. But donation limits could be applied retroactively to the group’s spending if she runs for federal office. (AP Photo/John Amis)
March 20, 2019 - 3:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Stacey Abrams has gone from losing the Georgia governor's race to being a heavily recruited Democratic star. It's a dramatic rise often fueled by the promotional spending of Fair Fight Action, a nonprofit she founded to advance voting rights. It can accept unlimited sums of money...
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March 19, 2019 - 11:04 pm
BROOKLYN, Iowa (AP) — An Iowa highway patrolman who was recently elected to the Legislature wrote almost no tickets to his future constituents as he made his first run for public office. Iowa State Patrol statistics show that the annual number of citations issued by Trooper Jon Thorup plummeted in...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2018 file photo, then Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach responds to questions from reporters in Topeka, Kan. An appeals court in Salt Lake City, will consider Monday, March 18, 2019, the constitutionality of a struck down Kansas statute that had required people to provide documents proving U.S. citizenship before they could register to vote. (AP Photo/John Hanna, File)
March 18, 2019 - 1:35 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The Latest on an appeals court weighing whether to resurrect a Kansas proof-of-citizenship voting law (all times local): 12:30 p.m. A federal appeals court has heard arguments about whether Kansas should be allowed to resurrect a law that required people to submit proof of...
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FILE - In this April 27, 2017 file photo, a police officer wears a newly-issued body camera outside in New York. In 2018, the New York City Police Department, the nation’s largest, stopped releasing body camera video after a police union successfully argued in court that they were confidential personnel records. But the department vowed in February 2019 to continue releasing video of officer-involved shootings after an appeals court ruled that the union’s argument “would defeat the purpose of the body-worn-camera program.” (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
March 13, 2019 - 2:14 pm
IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — The video is brief but disturbing: An officer is seen striking an unarmed suspect with his pistol as the man falls into the grass. An autopsy would later show he died from a gunshot to the back of the head. After the death last July of 26-year-old Daniel Fuller in Devils Lake...
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March 12, 2019 - 10:32 pm
SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Former San Antonio City Council member Ray Lopez has defeated Fred Rangel in a special election runoff for the Texas House 125 seat. With all precincts reporting Tuesday, the Democrat Lopez drew 58 percent of the vote to the Republican Rangel's 42 percent. Lopez will immediately...
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March 11, 2019 - 7:55 pm
LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — A former Nebraska Republican Party intern who later worked as a paid campaign staffer for Gov. Pete Ricketts apologized Monday after being exposed as the person behind a series of hateful online posts in which he used anti-Semitic and homophobic slurs and advocated for violence...
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House Budget Committee Chair John Yarmuth, D-Ky., walks through the Capitol in Washington, Monday morning March 11, 2019, as President Donald Trump's 2020 budget is delivered to his committee. Trump's new budget calls for billions more for his border wall, with steep cuts in domestic programs but increases for military spending. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
March 11, 2019 - 3:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — "Medicare for All" has become catnip for Democratic presidential candidates and many lawmakers, yet Republicans prepping for next year's congressional races are also flocking to it — for entirely different reasons. GOP strategists say they'll use proposals to expand government-run...
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In this Oct. 31, 2017 photo, the downtown skyline over looks Lake Michigan in Milwaukee. The Democratic National Committee has selected Milwaukee to host the 2020 national convention. (Mike De Sisti/Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel via AP)
March 11, 2019 - 10:23 am
MILWAUKEE (AP) — Milwaukee's pick as host to the 2020 Democratic National Convention will give the city on the shores of Lake Michigan the chance to show the world it's shedding its Rust Belt image. State and local officials who successfully lobbied to get the DNC to Milwaukee see a city on the...
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Penelope Muse Abernathy, a University of North Carolina professor, stands with the daily newspaper selection in the Park Library at the School of Journalism in Chapel Hill, N.C., on Thursday, March 7, 2019. "Strong newspapers have been good for democracy, and both educators and informers of a citizenry and its governing officials. They have been problem-solvers," said Abernathy, who studies news industry trends and oversaw the "news desert" report released the previous fall. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
March 10, 2019 - 10:27 pm
One of the last investigations Jim Boren oversaw before he retired as executive editor of The Fresno Bee was a four-month examination of substandard housing in the city at the heart of California's Central Valley. The multimedia project revealed the living conditions imposed on many of the city's...
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In this Feb. 19, 2019 photo, the old Daily Guide office stands for sale in St. Robert, Mo. With the shutdown of the newspaper in September 2018, this area in central Missouri's Ozark hills joined more than 1,400 other cities across the United States to lose a newspaper over the past 15 years, according to an Associated Press analysis of data compiled by the University North Carolina. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
March 09, 2019 - 11:01 pm
WAYNESVILLE, Mo. (AP) — The local news industry is struggling from a decline in readers and advertising, especially in small towns across the US. Over the past 15 years, more than 1,400 towns and cities have lost a newspaper. Among them are the twin towns of Waynesville and St. Robert in central...
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